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democrats. in april 2011, a law took affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from parks to marketplaces to shops. although the law does not mention the words women, muslim, boar can, or even israelied, it was introduced by president as a ban on muslim vailing which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law rear renders. have adopted some type of restriction. on april 28, 2011, the belgium voted far similar ban although the law is expected to be challenged before the constitutional court. in spain, in 2010, the say -- in all public places reversing an earlier vote supporting the ban. similar laws in progress in italy as well. in switzerland, after at campaign designed to aappeal to fears of the muslim takeover. a popular referendum voted by 57% to ban the construction of -- [inaudible] associated with the mosques. despite the fact that very few mosques in switzerland have them. they are only four in the whole country out of 150 mosques. and that in consequence, the architect issue is cl
votes separated the candidates. and yet, it is still legal under federal law in america to discriminate in hiring in employment on the basis of sexual orientation or identity. these are forgone conclusions for people of color and faiths but for the lgbt community the fight still rages on. with me tico, welcome to the show. >> it's great to go back. >> eliot: especially after you've had this year. one big win after another what made this happen? >> this year's election was a turning point for americans and our movement for fairness and for justice under the law. and i think president obama has proven once and for all that elected officials can take a strong stance in favor of lgbt fairness and not fear backlash from the voters. i'm not talking about his marriage equality, which is historic, his agencies put through dozens and dozens of changes things like hospital visitation, no discrimination in housing, and despite these wonderful advance there is was no backlash. the republicans didn't use this as a wedge issue. they didn't run ads on it. they didn't bring it up at the debate. there w
.k. and across the european union. >> past centralization when it comes to labor law, when it comes to financial service regulation, when it comes to even fairly mundane things like agricultural production, there is this extraordinary degree of centralization. harmonization has not created a utopia. it has created misery and poverty for millions of europeans. >> this seaside resort lies in the heart of his constituency. most of the arguments when it comes to the you relate to the economy. -- most of the arguments when it comes to the e you relate to the economy -- most of the arguments when it comes to the eu. >> i think we're just failing to allow a lot of the time, and then our own country is suffering. we're too busy dealing with everyone else. am i think the -- >> i think the eu has a lot to do to get itself out of trouble. >> those in favor of the eu are in the minority here, but they are part of. one growth organizes cultural exchanges -- one group organizes cultural exchanges. they are going to supply the local christmas market with wine from their local german city. >> i feel part of eur
for an hour with students about the supreme court and constitutional law. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you, and thank you, david, for that gracious introduction, and all of you for a very, very warm welcome. this is my first visit to rice, and i'm already glad that i came. president lee told you i can't talk about anything current, future, or past. [laughter] my remarks will be brief. [laughter] i had the pleasure of knowing david for 35 years. as he mentioned, he was the president back then too of the harvard law review. he's used to holding the reigns of power. a chief justice also holds the reigns of power. the only difference is that a chief justice has to hold them lightly, less he discover they are not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps a faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to light a special vision, talent, and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to vis
alreadyaving an effect >> in russia, a new law has come into fce, requiring organizations that receive funding from abroad t risr fei ant dam conscious of the days of the cold war, and the affected grpsre n aalhay abtho ilitions. >> many plan to boycott the law, including an election watchdog. this russian election watchdog now has to declare itself a foreign agent because it receives funding from the u.s. and eop. >>t is car tos that any group that does not register as an agent and is viewed as a nuisance by the state apparatus lle rsto be put throu the wnger by th authorities. >> the new law passed tou paianturing the summer with virtually no public outcry. it is backed by the ruling united russia party, which is allied to president vladimir putin. supporters of the law sayt is simply a way to identify groups involved in russian politics who use funds from overseas. >> i do not think it is reeson its just aay of classifying politically active citizens groups. may be someone could explain to me what is so impressive about th. group could continue to operate without foreign funding, but it wo
. >> california's new law banning the sale of shark fin set to take affect january 1. some members of the chinese community aren't ready to let it go into effect without a fight. >> the practice of cutting off a shark fin then<4gÑ tossing the body back is illegal in the u.s.. there are no endangered shark species in the us us and we have strong protection measures but the law aims to reduce demand that shet tletens populations in other parts of the world. shark fin soup is a delicacy but beginning january 1 it bill prohibits the sale or possession of shark fins in california. the cna filed a lawsuit to block the bill saying the law sold to voters. >> what laws are is that you cannot hold the fin. you can hold other parts of the shark but cannot have the fin. >> today they say he is worried about the small import qlorz might go out of business now. supporters say they're trying to stop the cruel practice known as finning. the fin is removed and rest of the shark thrown in to die. he and cna say that that is the case this is not the best approach. feeling it's discrime in a tori. >> you can go to
they are on camera. >> biggest difference is is that is their house. there are still eavesdropping laws that apply to that when you are in a public place if you have visible cameras and a sign that says you are on video surveillance you have to say it's in the eye of the mannequin. >> the mannequin is not visible. you think you are just looking at a mannequin not an eye. >> she is looking at me and staring at me. >> stick around much more on legal debate. we will twin other topics this morning. a teen sentenced to church instead of going to jail for accidentally killing someone in his car. the aclu says it's unconstitutional. does the punishment fit the crime? with verizon. hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities
miscarried. she was denied an abortion because of ireland's strict abortion laws. now her husband's speaking out to cnn's nic robertson. >> reporter: he has lost his wife and now fears the truth behind her tragic death may be lost too. >> some key information is missing. >> reporter: they met in india, married then set up home in ireland four years ago. he is an engineer. she was a dentist. they were happy here. >> she loved dancing. she forced me to dance with her a couple of times on the stage. we gave a performance. never have i gone on stage or i never had. i always had stage fear to go to speak out and the belief she gave me. it was unbelievable. >> reporter: together they had dreams of a beautiful future, of children, their children, of having a family. >> she was looking forward basically. in a way she found that she is at the right place. that's the reason why. she knew and she was very well organized as well. she knew what she wanted in life. so that's the reason why she had decided to settle here on the long-term. >> reporter: when she became pregnant, they were overjoyed. then the
sources that a team led by executives from kpmg as well as a law firm here in india and as of now, the chief financial officer along with another couple of key executives have been suspended. they've been asked not to report to work until this internal investigation is complete. this couldn't have come at a worst time because remember the india parliament has been given the go ahead as far as walmart being able to step up its stores here in india. so this is going to be another reason for the opposition parties to force the government into a possible reversal of the decision. so it's looking difficult for walmart at this point in time. we've tried to contact the company. they have confirmed the investigation is on. there is no time line that's been given by when they expect a conclusion for this internal investigation, but until the investigation is not complete, we've been given to understand that the chief financial officer and the other executives asked not to report to work will not be allowed to be part of the operati operation. this may jeopardize their expansion plans. that
to die. the chinatown neighborhood association says there is a law against finning. there are no endangered shark species in the u.s.. saying it's not fair to use the rest of the legally caught sharks just not the fin. the association says it plans to take this all the way to the supreme court necessary. >> there is word help for salmon populations is working. >> officials say the population in the russian river is thriving. >> this is dry creek. a beautiful day. but there is more going on here, if you look, beneath that water you can see salmon. preparing to spawn and continue the life cycle this, year, they are coming back in larger numbers than we've seen in the last decade. >> p excess of 6300 fish. >> that is doctor greg horton they have been focusing on coho and stheeld but seeing choonic in large numbers bodes well. >> it's an indicator of how good conditions are. >> and a good start, anyway. >> time to check on the forecast. >> high hi, spencer we're in post thanksgiving glow. mild weatherév9(ç continues. you can see cloud free skies now. it's been another
here thanks to oscar corral and his mother-in-law and some others i found out that the real little havana in latvia is hialeah. but it's not very little anymore. about 225,000 people. and that was the population of miami within the city limits. >> within miami proper? just over 400,000. >> i thought little havana was around -- [inaudible] and if you wield a cup of cuban coffee, you watch the old men play checkers across the street, you'd been there. [laughter] >> well, speaking of oscar, you have a incredible reputation for the amount of research that you do when you're writing a book. how do you compare the research you did for "charlotte simmons" or "man in full" to the research you did in miami for "blood," and i don't think you've ever done this before, so what was it like having a camera following you around during your research? i know that when i was in office, oscar corral followed me around all the time, and i didn't particularly like it, so -- [laughter] >> you'll see for yourself what happened to me when oscar followed me around. he's on after we arement the one thing i
condemnation, uganda and nigeria's parliaments are set to vote through harsh anti-gay laws. life in prison. >> this goes beyond the principle of nondiscrimination. it goes against the principle of privacy, of individuals, and sexual orientation is really a question of the right of an individual to choose how they want to live their lives. >> reporter: david courier, a prominent kenyan activist, says it goes further. he says gays are often denied the right to health care and legal help. their only option is to hide. being open about your sexuality has caused people to be killed. >> exactly. in many cases it's not even an option. it's either that or death. >> reporter: on the streets, there are supporters of the bills. >> our culture, our traditional culture, has no room for gays. besides that, when we add on the cription values which have been attained by the nation, then certainly there's no room for gays. >> man to woman. not man to man. it's bad. so i don't know where they get the idea from. it's a bad idea. we don't like it in africa. >> there's a law against gays in the constitution. t
the time to ask your employer to cut fat check. rich edson joins us from washington. >> the law says taxes are going up. trying to avert the full tax hike so we really don't know who will pay more or if anyone will pay more. one tax expert says a conservative tax play this year means plning for those higher rates. >> you're going to have to maybe assume or gas tax rates will go up rather dramaticay for higher income individuals. you might want to consider taking income where you have that option through compensation planning, businesses or where you are on a cash basis to explt income. >> advisors say take any bonuses before the first of the year is nearly five percentage point increase in the top income bracket and .9% health care surtax in january. the top rate for dividend jumps to nearly 40%, the health care law adds 3.8% on top of that. take capital gains at the top rate goes, and 3.8% health care tax on top of that. push expenses featuring tax deductions into the future beyond this year. use those seductions next year or after when rates are set to increase. congress could delay much
of people were showing up and it transformed the way we think that people began to question the law that was passed as obamacare
and child labor laws and it took four years, until 1944 when we invented the word teenager and the birth of 17 magazine. there is some irony that youth was invented by somebody in their 60's. the main lesson really is that the stages of life were essentially responsive to problems. they were solutions and it's ironic that g. stanley hal himself, the inventor of youth, who proposed 20 years later a new stage of life between midlife and old age. arguing that he had actually made a mistake. he should have invented the stage this stage iv people like himself. he promptly passed away a year later but in writing about this period he had a a set of beautiful images and insight which i think actually makes a lot of sense almost 100 years later. he described as period is an indian summer and he said human beings didn't reach the height of their capacity and tell a shadow started slanting eastward, which i love. essentially has idea was that more and more people were reaching a point where they have the benefits of experience in the capacity to do something with it. wrote a book a couple of years
who had physician cal maturity but not emotional maturity. we invented hools and child labor laws and it took forty years to create the word teenager. that was invented by somebody in their 60's but the main lesson is these stages of life were responses to problems. they were solutions. and it's ironic that it was stanley hall himself, the inventor of youth who proposed twenty years later a stage between midlife and old age arguing that he had actually made a mistake. he should have invented this stage for people like himself. he promptly passed away a year later but in writing about this period, he had asset of beautiful images and insights which make a lot of sense almost 100 years later. he described this period as an indian summer. and he said human beings didn't reach the height of their capacity until the shad dozen slanted eastward. the idea was more and more people were reaching a point where they had the benefits of experience and the capacity to do something with it. there was a book a couple of years ago that described the key traites of this period as active wisdom. i
. and again, we're asking you and your group to leave. >> no. >> california law gives us the right to talk to customers and handle in front of the stores. >> if you don't leave, we will get the police involved. >> reporter: organizers are calling for walmart to improve employee wages and working conditions. other walmarts targeted today include the richmond and fairfield stores as well as the story road location in east san jose. >>> thanks for coming by channel 5 this morning, by the way. it's 5:06. let's get the latest look at weather and traffic. we are going to begin with the lady who is dressed appropriately. >> very good. it's actually navy, brian. >> looks black to me. >> it's dark. [ laughter ] >>> black friday so we're hoping the commute is not going to be a bad one. actually it's looking okay right now. this is our one incident that we had earlier this morning. northbound 680 approaching landess avenue. we had a traffic light down in the road but all lanes are free and clear on northbound 680 so it's cruising through milpitas. live look at 880, people may be heading towards area
." on this day, the action came from a family shopping for their future daughter-in-law. "they bought a mongol sutra with earings, a necklace with earrings and another chain. turns out to be about 216,000 indian rupees." at today's exchange rate, that buy translates to more than $4,000 in gold. and while not every indian can afford that kind of outlay, all families will need to buy some gold when their children get married. "if from the lady's side they don't come up with the gold, there's going to be a problem. so they have to buy a lot of gold. they don't have a choice." > > everyone? "everyone. believe me everyone." more than just a gift, gold is valued as a safe investment, and for its liquidity. "you have gold, you can sell it into the marketplace and grab the money. it's so easy." the new shipping complex behind me in the southern city of kochin represents the booming economy. and with growth projections here as high as 7% for the year, the expanding indian market for goal could push prices past $2500 an ounce. "buy it, keep it, buy 24-carat gold, put it in a locker, and when you need mo
people in. >> san jose city councilman says the laws of hockey fans has hurt local bars and restaurants. >> you don't know what you have until you have it. that's what is happening. >> gomez misses all of the hungry shark fans, but hopes the festival will be a gift. >> without this, we will be a really sad holiday. >> have i a long-time sharks fan since i was a kid. >> he opened it up weeks after the lockout began. he hopes the holidays will bring new customers. the olympic skating champion whose husband plays in the nhl believes a little holiday spirit is neated. is needed. >> we have the absence of the hockey season and hopefully with christmas in the park it will be an amazing opportunity for families to enjoy the holidays. hopefully that will help the economy here in downtown. >> now, with no end in sight, the nhl canceled all games through mid-december. still many here are optimistic that the sharks will take to the ice again before the end of the year. live in san jose, cornell bernard, abc7 news. >> thank you. >>> it was a perfect evening for christmas tree lighting around the ba
at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> paul rothstein is a law professor and an here is to talk to us about petitions to secede filed in every state, citizens have signed to secede from the united states, many of which side to the declaration of independence or the size of government. professor rothstein, welcome to the program. are you surprised by all of these petitions coming from across the country? is this a new phenomenon? guest: during my lifetime there have been several, near every time people get upset with an issue, there is a movement on the part of some people to get to their state to secede. host: what is it that is driving this movement this time around? guest: dissatisfaction with who won the election. it was relatively close, not that hair close, but a lot of people feel strongly about it. host: talk to us about what is actually in the constitution, or how a state would go about seceding from the united states. guest: there is nothing directly in the constitution about it. there are some things that the different sides of the debate site in their favor. perhaps the strongest
. that's all. that is our understanding. discussing based on multi international law. >> right. i know the united states recognizes -- who think post these islands? hoodie think has control of the islands? >> whoever has the better navy. [laughter] >> got it. this gentleman right here. yes. >> is this on? henry roth from canada. we heard technology is often the . the forgotten factor. only the numbers show about 50 million chinese men and women are involved in scientific research. like everything else, it has a jekyll and hyde personality. let's leave that aside for a moment with cyber issues and other issues that are important. some could argue that rather large segment of the chinese population is probably one of the most globally connected an open parts. looking at a way of engaging china and sing china's place in the world on this important aspect of economic development and political development, county see this playing out? i know both india and japan have engaged. >> responses to the dr. jekyll? >> sun's technology, at math, funnel to the growth of the economy's. the u.s. has wo
the campaign finance laws. the citizens united decision was totally predictable as a response to mccain-fine gold. despite my working for john mccain, who had a campaign finance reform position i always thought was blazingly unconstitutional -- we have weakened the political parties and weaken the candidate committees. the political parties have been moderating influences in american politics -- the political parties goal is to assemble a majority, not to advance an ideology. the advancement of an ideology by either party is secondary, is a function of the majority. now, with all the super pac money there is increasingly ideological money, increasing the enforcement money. reagan talked about the fact that if you are with me 80% of the time you are not my political opponent, you are my political ally. in a super pac world where you have a apostate republican or an apostate democrats on an issue, you will see the enforcement of ideological discipline through the use of the super pac in a primary on either the left or the right. it has the fact, i think, of polarizing the electorate of an
george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by the united states armed forces color guard, the singing of our national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming, whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming, and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, i gave proof through the ni
in to find out who shot j.r. in 1980. turned out to be his sister-in-law kristen. that success was no big surprise for hagman. he was born into a show biz family. his mom the legendary actress mary martin, but it was a blonde with magic powers that helped propel hagman to star status. he played astronaut tony nelson in the nbc sitcom "i dream of jeannie" for five seasons. after that role came hagman's role of "dallas." years of hard drinking came back to haunt him. he suffered from cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer. and in july of 1995 he received a transplant that saved his life. this year he starred in season one of the next generation of "dallas" on tnt with some of his original co-stars. he appeared with them on "today" back in june to talk about reprising the role of j.r. ewing. >> yeah, it was strange kind of getting back into the swing of things, but we all fit right into our characters again, so there was nothing to worry about that. >> hagman filmed appearances for the show's second season, set to begin airing in january. larry hagman was 81 years old. he is survived by his
and in the case of singapore, tough local law which is try to restrict local gaming. so when china slows down, the bottom lines shrink. joining us to more is aaron fisher. good to see you. thanks for joining us. what happens next particularly on the macao gaming scene? >> we've had some amazing years of growth in made ycamacao. last year's growth rate was 42. but those days are definitely over. average 35% for seven years. the basis got much higher thousand. one of the main reasons why the growth is slowing down is because we are massively capacity constrained in macao and singapore. so the fact that the pmi looks like it's recovering a little bit recently and looking a bit better for next year, we wouldn't expect major growth. we're looking for about 10% growth to next year and also the year after. >> you've analyzed stocks, some companies that will start raining cash. and if you were going to analyze them warren buffett style would be quite attractive. what are they and what are the key characteristics? >> we had a report out called raining cash and still raining cash over the last couple o
the workers comp. >> and that's not right or wrong. it happens to be the law. >> i'm interested in your conversations as i always found with the national football league have the same situation. >> i'm not speaking for the national football league. >> the great thing under our cpa is the cost of workers conversation is actually borne by the players. so we live in a world under the cba with the insurance cost is basically estimated every year and that is a benefit that goes to the team. so the good news that these for our football teams and i'm always worried i'll say something good about nfl owners, but this is one of them. when it comes to the cost of insurance is something reimbursed. the world we live in the mix is somewhat ironic as even though costs are reimbursed, the teams nonetheless finds that workers comp, which is interesting. i could probably choose another word other than interesting, but it's a family show. i'm always interested in this issue of workers compensation, but going back to these big ideas, recognizing when our players get hurt, our leadership refuses to call it
than building and providing more supplies. indeed, there is no repealing the laws of supply and demand. this is actually where jane jacobs was getting it wrong. she noted that old buildings were cheap and new buildings were expensive. which led her to believe that you should make sure that no one builds all building on top of new buildings. she didn't need to look any further than the impact of freezing a city. it was affordable and she and her husband lived there in the 1950s and has turned into a place where townhouses were cheap and that is what happens when you turn off the chain of building new houses. one of the reasons it is important to allow new buildings, it is the environment. i will end by telling a story of a young graduate who went for walk in the woods. and he did a little fishing, and the fishing was good. he came to put the fish into a chowder. the win came and put the flames that he was using in the fire started and spread. eventually, it was a raging inferno that burned down acres of woodland. in his own day, this man would be called an enemy of the environment. it i
could not overturn any law he has issued since taking power in june. opposition protesters have called for a sit-in in tahir jair while the muslim brotherhood said they will stage nationwide demonstrations in support of morsi's plans. >>> as the truce holds between hamas and israel for if fourth day, president mahmoud abbas is confident. palestinian factions are supporting the effort but the others are opposing it. >>> finally lotto fever. lottery officials say there were no winners in last night's power lottery pushing this week's jackpot to under $425 million. that's the largest jackpot ever for the game. those are your top stories. now back to "fareed zakaria gps." >>> we live in a borderless world, right, where globalization, inper dependence, and economics are reshaping the way companies and countries cooperate. not quite, says robert kaplan. he's written a book called "the revenge of geography: what the map tells us about coming conflicts and the battle of flight." >> he joins me now. you have this terrific book out. explain what the premise is. mine i tried to very briefly do it
you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>> now for our "what in the world" segment. with president obama's visit to asia and war in gaza, they have been focused on the far east and middle east. let's not forget the surprising developments in the region we share a 2,000-mile border with, latin america. i just read a new world bank report -- yeah, that is what i do in my spare time -- and it has some important findings. between the years 2003 and 2009, nearly 50 million people joined latin america's middle class. that's twice the entire population of the state of texas and the sixth of america's population as a whole. in those six years, the size of the region's middle class expanded by 50%. the proportion of people in poverty fell sharply from 44% to 30%. and as the rest of the world became more unequal, latin america was the only region to decrease the gap between rich and poor. the findings have important consequences locally, but also for the world. when china lifted hundreds of milli
's office. board president george shirakawa is accused of violating state campaign ethics laws and misusing public funds. he is not denying allegation he wasted taxpayer money on fancy meals, resorts and political contributions. >> i don't want you to be distracted by the political lynching that you read today and continue to read about in the print media. i want you to understand that for 50 years, i have been nurtured and raised and lived in peace in this community. >> shirakawa has paid back more than $5,000 for expenses he charged on his county credit card. >>> san francisco is joining most of the nation in requiring people now to wear clothing in public. >> shame on you! >> shame on you! >> as you can see, some people objected yesterday after the board of supervisors voted to ban public nudity. the bill sponsor scott weiner says there needs to be a balance of rights. >> taking your pants off at castro market and displaying your genitals to everyone, that's not free expression. >> starting in february, first- time violators will face a $100 fine. a third offense will be $500 and a year
strike. the downtown needs to be able to bring people in. >> san jose city councilman says the laws of hockey fans has hurt local bars and restaurants. >> you don't know what you have until you have it. that's what is happening. >> gomez misses all of the hungry shark fans, but hopes the festival will be a gift. >> without this, we will be a really sad holiday. >> have i a long-time sharks fan since i was a kid. >> he opened it up weeks after the lockout began. he hopes the holidays will bring new customers. the olympic skating champion whose husband plays in the nhl believes a little holiday spirit is neated. is needed. >> we have the absence of the hockey season and hopefully with christmas in the park it will be an amazing opportunity for families to enjoy the holidays. hopefully that will help the economy here in downtown. >> now, with no end in sight, the nhl canceled all games through mid-december. still many here are optimistic that the sharks will take to the ice again before the end of the year. live in san jose, cornell bernard, abc7 news. >> thank you. >>> it was a perfec
. >> not anymore. following our story, congress passed a law permitting its members for trading on non-public information. we began investigating charlatans. our report started a federal investigation. if convicted, they could face 20 years in prison. >> you became a made man when you were formally inducted. >> after a few minutes in the toxic recycling center, the gangs who run this place want to keep it a secret. >> if i ever get a shot at bin laden, we will take it. we got it. you will not see bin laden walking on this earth again. >> miners' world collapsed. >> the idea of being here for 69 hours is terrifying. >> the most tragic thing you have ever seen. >> it was the deep water horizon. >> at the height of a hiss, a huge explosion. i remember thinking, i am going to die. >> we cannot do it. >> it was the worst feeling i had ever felt in my life. i was sure i could do it. >> i remember it coming close to six months. i was saying, i cannot believe i am out of work as long. >> i cannot afford my house. >> tell us how much your pay has been cut. >> 50%. >> we cannot make it. >> i wro
of law. the agreement and the private market competition it launched help spur in the years that followed trillions of dollars in new investment, in infrastructure, in telecommunications around the world, and help spur a huge certainly unprecedented wave of worldwide telecommunication technology innovation, mobile and internet. global access to communications service rose in the years following that agreement, especially for mobile services in developing countries that took the opportunity to leapfrog past wired networks. between 2001-2011, mobile phone adoption increased globally from 15% to 86%, one decade. from roughly 900 million people around the world having basic mobile service to 6 billion, in a decade. now, the u.s. benefit from this global growth, u.s. export in information and communication technology services quadrupled over that decade. and as a global market continues to grow as we get those new metrics that i described, mobile broadband access went from one to 5 billion, the u.s. economy will continue to benefit. but given his history and the fortune seat as a junior staffe
of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel, yet we only health -- have 100,000 of our people living there. is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty. you mentioned a search and rescue. at this time of year, but there are 24 hours a day and temperatures plummet below 50 degrees celsius. you have open waters and changes that are born to create a lot of challenges because more people are simply going to go there and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others who want to be a part of this arctic council. to your question about the obligation to, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and res
was spent by groups not required by law to disclose their donors. for more on where all that money went, what it bought, and what it means for future elections we turn to two reporters who've been tracking those numbers: matea gold of "the los angeles times." and eliza newlin carney, who covers this for "roll call" newspaper. and we thank you both for being with us. matea gold, let me start with you. most expensive election in history. how did that manifest itself? >> well, i think there's no question money played a remarkable and prominent role in this campaign in a way we haven't seen in recent years. this was the first presidential campaigns since a series of important federal government decisions, including the supreme court's decision in citizenses united that opened the door to more outside spending. that's what drove us to the record $6 billion spending you mentioned. outside groups played this enormous role, both pummeling the airwaves with ads from the presidential campaigns and senate and house races. i think there's no question they made the tenor of all the campaigns much mo
's and daily show, the comedian going after charles for his take on public unions and labor law. at 10:50 find out what john stewart said and that charles's response. charles: thank you very much. stuart: we have been harsh in our judgment of california. i referred to as the formerly golden state. it is nothing like the state that i lived in 35 years ago. it is not even close. here is my take on today's lead story in the new york times, quote, california find economic gloom starting to lift. really? here is the case at the times lays out. unemployment is down. home prices are rising and home sales are up. all through. but the main point is the state may be in budgetary surplus by 2014. there's a headline. budget surplus in california. hold on. read more closely. the projected surplus rests on the tax hikes that the state just voted for. the times buys into the opinion that tax hikes will bring in enough money to plug the deficit. this is the central theme of the liberal elite. you can have all the goodies if you just tax the rich. i beg to differ. raising taxes when california is in virtual re
providing more supply. is now repeating the laws of supply and demand. this is where jane jacobs got it wrong for she looked at old buildings and new buildings and noted that old buildings were cheap while new buildings were expensive. which led her to conclude the right way to observe affordable and was make sure no one got any new buildings on top of old buildings. that is now supply and demand works. you don't need to look any further their own historic preservation district of greenwich village which you worked so hard to create. her home district which was affordable when she and her husband lived there in the 1950s has turned into a place where town has to start $5 million only hedge fund managers need apply. that's what happens when you turn off the chain of building new housing. one of the reasons why so important to nurture our cities is one way to enable our cities to grow, is the environment. i'm going to end by telling a story of a young harvard college graduate is beautiful spring day in 1884 with for a walk and he did a little fishing. fishing was good. there hadn't bee
surrounding the passage of the budget control act. the law created automatic spending cuts set to take effect in january along with expiring tax provisions, part of the so- called fiscal cliff. that is tonight at 8:00 eastern on c-span. congress returns from a week long thanksgiving break this week. the house is back tomorrow to debate a number of bills. a major bill comes up on thursday when they will consider a visa program for students getting advanced degrees and computer science, engineering and mathematics. off the floor, democrats plan to let new leadership. that is scheduled for thursday. you can see the house tomorrow on c-span. the senate is back today at 2:00 eastern. they will finish work on what is called the sportsman bill, expanding hunting and fishing on federal lands. that begins at 5:30 eastern. you can see the senate live on our companion network, sees that2 -- c-span2. >> you listen to mayor bloomberg who says the damage was unprecedented. the previous high was 10 feet. for this high, the tidal surge was 14 feet. gov. chris christie said that the damage was unthinkable. at
tightening built into law, the so-called fiscal cliff. the realization of all the automatic tax increases and spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff absent offsetting changes would pose a substantial threat to recovery. indeed, by the reckoning of the congressional budget office, and that of many outside observers, a fiscal shock of that size would send the economy toppling back into recession. second, early in the new year it will be necessary to improve and increase the federal debt limit to -- approved an increase in the federal dedead -- debt limit. the threat of default in the summer of 2011 fueled economic uncertainty and badly damaged confidence even though an agreement was ultimately reached. a failure to reach a timely agreement this time around could impose even heavier economic and financial costs. as this policy makers face these critical decisions, they should keep two decisions in mind. first, the federal gobudget is on an unsustainable path. the budget deficit, which peaked 2009, is expected to narrow further in the coming years as the economy continues to recover. how
that there is not a rule of law. and it is obviously the divisions are clear. >> we saw explosions literally not far from you, we saw you ducking, ben wedeman, arwa damon, sara sidner, they were pretty close to you. >> yeah, very close. we were standing in front of an open window like this and you could feel the shock waves, the blast waves through your body. >> really? >> the windows rattled, the building itself would shake. we're talking, you know, a block away, two or three or four or five blocks away. it's startling. ben wedeman is much made of sturdier stuff and i and was able to stand without ducking quite so much as i did. but it really brings home to you what it's like for gazans. >> you can only imagine the terror these people were feeling. >> oh, it was terrifying. and we were there for three nights. i was able to leave. they don't have any other place to go. >> when you got out you got out through a process through israel. >> yes, it's very laborious. >> it's very restricted. >> it is. you give him a passport, he writes it down in a spiral notebook, that's it, there's no stamp. you take a seri
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